Hexagon tip

Another visual for you – I made a template from Templar (heat resistant template plastic).    No – the template does not need to be heat resistant, but it is a plastic I can see though for fussy cutting.

First, using a pencil, I draw around the hexagon paper on the frosted side of the Templar for the current project.  Then use a rotary cutter that I’ve designated for paper/plastic, use a ruler to add a 1/4″ on all six sides when cutting out the template for this project.  You can see my pencil line for the actual hexi size on the plastic, it is faint, but you can see it.

hexagon paper, my Templar template and fabric fussy cut for one flower

hexagon paper, my Templar template and fabric fussy cut for one flower

I’m working on this project mostly in the car when Russ is driving.

cut out hexis for flowers and the centers in stacks.  I get my papers from 'Paper Pieces' - friendly fast service!

Cut out stacks of hexis for flowers including the centers. I get my papers from ‘Paper Pieces’ – friendly fast service!

Below are path hexis in a pile and covered hexi stacks for flowers.  To keep the flower hexis pieces together, I use needle and thread, knot both the top and bottom until you are not bumping along on the highway and can stitch them together.

pile of path hexes, and small  stacks for each flower, so I don't have to sort everything when ready to assemble.

pile of path hexes, and small stacks for each flower, so I don’t have to sort everything when ready to assemble.

A little planning will go a long way on this project, no do-overs or re-sorting.

Maybe a little efficient!

Have a great time working on your hexi project!

Prairie Rose BOM

If you have been looking around to see what this great quilt looks like, follow the link below to my friend Debbie Robert’s Blog for her quilt shop, the Quilted Moose in Gretna, Nebraska.

I designed the fabric line for the BOM, Debbie designed the beautiful quilt and then added four projects for you enjoy!

http://www.quiltedmoose.com/the-quilts-of-prairie-rose

Thought you all would like to see what the buzz is about – maybe you need to join in the fun!

Happy Stitching!

 

Hexagon tip

I learned about path hexis when I was in Australia a couple of years ago.

Before we left – I cut out a ‘lot’ of hexagons from assorted fabrics so I could cover the papers and begin to make flowers while on Holiday!

While stitching with my friends, one told me to be sure to cover ‘path’ hexis while making flowers, if you wait until you have all the flowers made, you will be bored to tears with only covering and adding path hexis.  This nice lady was on her second large hexagon quilt.

First – figure out your layout for your flowers, so ‘you’ know what you need for your path.  There are a lot of pictures on museum websites and on Pinterest that show interesting settings in antique hexagon quilts.  Also look to books with pictures of antique quilts for your inspiration.

I determined a basic layout for this project – need 5 path hexis added to each flower:

add 5 path hexis to my flowers like this

add 5 path hexis to my flowers like this

I’ve arranged a few of the flowers that have 5 path hexis added,  you can see where this project is headed and that the path will join together for a frame around each flower.

And yes – I’m ‘fussy cutting’ my fabrics to add interest.  Part of the fun for me is seeing what great flowers happen with ‘fussy Cutting’ – so worth my effort.

this will be my layout, one row of path hexis around my flowers - as you can see the flowers share path hexes

this will be my layout, one row of path hexis around my flowers – as you can see the flowers share path hexis

When you get all your flowers made, you will begin to join the flowers to make diagonal rows.

when you pull the layout apart, you will eventually join the flowers to make diagonal rows.

when you pull the layout apart, you will eventually join the flowers to make diagonal rows.

When you begin to join the rows, recommend you remove the center papers, ‘leaving the edge hexi papers in’, until you have joined the next row.

This is what I do, I’m sure you will get other opinions, just sharing!

The interesting next step – how to finish off.

Don’t ask me why I have a few tops that are not finished off – they still have the edge hexi papers in them.  Will tackle it one of these days when I have extra time to play.

Have fun with your EPP (English Paper Piecing) projects!

Or by all means – be sure to join in the fun!

 

 

hexagon tree skirt – more

A lady emailed me, asking how did I finish off my little hexagon tree skirt.

I took a picture of the back and emailed it to her – realized the need to share it with you.

I took the lazy way out – it was a little bit of Christmas Decor – didn’t need a big finish IMHO.

I left the papers in on the edges, easy peasy finish.  If one arranges it nicely, no one knows!

Shhhh, this is our secret, OK?

back side of little tree skirt for the Holidays

back side of little tree skirt for the Holidays

 

What are you working on?

I’m sewing doll/small quilts for JLW Club 13 for 2014 – having fun at the studio!

Happy Stitching!!!

Green Acres

American Patchwork & Quilting – October, 2013 issue – arriving soon in your mailbox and on newsstands soon.

cover APQ, October 2013

cover APQ, October 2013

My quilt project begins on page 56, below is the flat shot.

Green Acres quilt, flat shot

Green Acres quilt, flat shot

Wait until you see the beautiful set shot in the magazine!

Was a fun quilt to make, it is around 40 inches square, there is also a small companion project that will be on their website –  All People Quilt.  I know you have time for this one!

Happy Stitching!

 

hexi tip

I posted this to Facebook through Instagram, want to share with you too.

I’m working on a new hexi project, I’ve planned out the flowers (maybe a little control freak going on), after I’ve covered the papers for a flower, I needed a way to keep them together, then I remembered seeing vintage blocks kept together with thread.

So (or sew) . . .  knot your thread, run the needle through the center of the hexi, stack the 7 pieces, make a knot on top and voila!  Hope you find this tip useful.

hexi flower tied together

hexi flower tied together

I was covering hexis while riding to/from Omaha, it is about an hour each way, was taking advantage of the sitting time, didn’t have my close up sewing glasses with me, but I was able to cover a few sets of these.